History Preserved


The Kubli House is an iconic landmark of Jacksonville. At over 160 years old, this Victorian-style home is on the National Register of Historic Places.  The house was fully restored in 2021 by owners, Brian and Kathleen Dunn, working as a husband-wife design-build team. 

During the renovation process, all walls and utilities were replaced inside the house, while keeping historical features intact.  This included saving the original wood floors, which were fully restored. Original doors and windows were also retained where possible and made functional once again.

Externally, all features of the home were repaired or restored to their original likeness, using identical materials.  This included a full rebuild of the signature wrap-around porch, which now stands exactly as it stood before.

21st Century Experience


Throughout the renovation process, modern building techniques were employed to ensure a luxurious stay for our guests.  First, double walls and sound dampening materials were added between all suites to minimize noise, a key challenge for historic structures. Then, insulation and advanced HVAC systems were added to maintain a comfortable environment and the highest air quality.  Lastly, modern professional touches were added to make each room distinct and to bring this historic home into the 21st Century.

Materials Repurposed


During the process to replace the failing brick foundation, oversized carriage stones were discovered under the house and over 12,000 bricks were extracted. These materials were then repurposed into veneer walls, steps, and pathways all around the property. Much of the excess brick was also handed off to local businesses, residents, and design professionals in Jacksonville for adaptive reuse.

KUBLI FAMILY HISTORY


While not the first occupant, this was the former home of Kaspar Kubli, one of the City’s original pioneers who emigrated to Jacksonville in 1852 from Switzerland. While on the wagon train west across the Great Plains, Kaspar met his wife, Eleanor Jan Newcomb. Together they had 7 children, first living in the Applegate area, and later moving into Jacksonville.

After spending his first few years mining gold, Kaspar became a successful businessman specializing in a variety of trades, from running a flour mill, to operating a trading post and owning a livery and feed stable. He even worked as a printer and telegraph operator.

In his later years, Kubli became a hardware merchant in Jacksonville and built the historic two-story commercial brick building on California Street that bears his name today. More can be read about the Kubli house and family history at www.historicjacksonville.org.